2020欧洲杯时间

Part I

Anna Sewell's classic novel tells the life story of a horse who experiences both hardship and kindness.

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definitions & notes only words
  1. whinny
    make a characteristic sound, of a horse
    One day, when there was a good deal of kicking, my mother whinnied to me to come to her...
  2. colt
    a young male horse under the age of four
    The colts who live here are very good colts, but they are cart-horse colts, and of course they have not learned manners.
  3. gig
    small two-wheeled horse-drawn carriage
    My mother always took him to the town on a market day in a light gig.
  4. canter
    go at a smooth three-beat gait, of horses
    The oldest of the colts raised his head, pricked his ears, and said, “There are the hounds!” and immediately cantered off, followed by the rest of us to the upper part of the field, where we could look over the hedge and see several fields beyond.
  5. squire
    an English country landowner
    I heard afterward that it was young George Gordon, the squire's only son, a fine, tall young man, and the pride of his family.
  6. farrier
    a person who shoes horses
    There was now riding off in all directions to the doctor's, to the farrier's, and no doubt to Squire Gordon's, to let him know about his son.
  7. toll
    ring slowly
    Not many days after we heard the church-bell tolling for a long time, and looking over the gate we saw a long, strange black coach that was covered with black cloth and was drawn by black horses; after that came another and another and another, and all were black, while the bell kept tolling, tolling.
  8. bridle
    headgear for a horse
    It means to teach a horse to wear a saddle and bridle, and to carry on his back a man, woman or child; to go just the way they wish, and to go quietly.
  9. coax
    influence or urge by gentle urging, caressing, or flattering
    I had of course long been used to a halter and a headstall, and to be led about in the fields and lanes quietly, but now I was to have a bit and bridle; my master gave me some oats as usual, and after a good deal of coaxing he got the bit into my mouth, and the bridle fixed, but it was a nasty thing!
  10. girth
    a band around a horse's belly that holds the saddle in place
    Next came the saddle, but that was not half so bad; my master put it on my back very gently, while old Daniel held my head; he then made the girths fast under my body, patting and talking to me all the time; then I had a few oats, then a little leading about; and this he did every day till I began to look for the oats and the saddle.
  11. whence
    from what place, source, or cause
    I was feeding quietly near the pales which separated the meadow from the railway, when I heard a strange sound at a distance, and before I knew whence it came—with a rush and a clatter, and a puffing out of smoke—a long black train of something flew by, and was gone almost before I could draw my breath.
  12. restive
    being in a tense state
    Since then I have seen many horses much alarmed and restive at the sight or sound of a steam engine; but thanks to my good master's care, I am as fearless at railway stations as in my own stable.
  13. rook
    a common bird about the size and color of a crow
    At this time I used to stand in the stable and my coat was brushed every day till it shone like a rook's wing.
  14. plucky
    showing courage
    As for Merrylegs, he and I soon became great friends; he was such a cheerful, plucky, good-tempered little fellow that he was a favorite with every one, and especially with Miss Jessie and Flora, who used to ride him about in the orchard, and have fine games with him and their little dog Frisky.
  15. intimate
    marked by close acquaintance, association, or familiarity
    The cob was a strong, well-made, good-tempered horse, and we sometimes had a little chat in the paddock, but of course I could not be so intimate with him as with Ginger, who stood in the same stable.
  16. skittish
    unpredictably excitable, especially of horses
    Spirited horses, when not enough exercised, are often called skittish, when it is only play; and some grooms will punish them, but our John did not; he knew it was only high spirits.
  17. wean
    gradually deprive of mother's milk
    I never had any one, horse or man, that was kind to me, or that I cared to please, for in the first place I was taken from my mother as soon as I was weaned, and put with a lot of other young colts; none of them cared for me, and I cared for none of them.
  18. pine
    have a desire for something or someone who is not present
    I was high bred and had a great deal of spirit, and was very wild, no doubt, and gave them, I dare say, plenty of trouble, but then it was dreadful to be shut up in a stall day after day instead of having my liberty, and I fretted and pined and wanted to get loose.
  19. flank
    the side between ribs and hipbone
    The time went on, and the sun was very hot; the flies swarmed round me and settled on my bleeding flanks where the spurs had dug in.
  20. filly
    a young female horse under the age of four
    'Stand back,' said the master, 'and keep out of her way; you've done a bad day's work for this filly.'
  21. mettle
    the courage to carry on
    'If a high- mettled creature like this,' said he, 'can't be broken by fair means, she will never be good for anything.'
  22. chafe
    become or make sore by or as if by rubbing
    Besides that, to have two bits instead of one—and mine was a sharp one, it hurt my tongue and my jaw, and the blood from my tongue colored the froth that kept flying from my lips as I chafed and fretted at the bits and rein.
  23. surly
    unfriendly and inclined toward anger or irritation
    ...when I was in the stable, miserable and angry, instead of being smoothed and quieted by kindness, I got only a surly word or a blow.
  24. physic
    a purging medicine
    “Ay, ay, Jim, 'tis 'the Birtwick balls',” said John, “she'll be as good as Black Beauty by and by; kindness is all the physic she wants, poor thing!”
  25. vicar
    a clergyman appointed to act as priest of a parish
    Mr. Blomefield, the vicar, had a large family of boys and girls; sometimes they used to come and play with Miss Jessie and Flora.
  26. rogue
    a deceitful and unreliable scoundrel
    “There, you rogue, mind how you behave yourself, or we shall get into trouble.”
  27. vex
    disturb the peace of mind of
    "...I wouldn't vex our people for anything; I love them, I do,” said Merrylegs, and he gave a low “ho, ho, ho!” through his nose, as he used to do in the morning when he heard James' footstep at the door.
  28. spree
    a brief indulgence of your impulses
    Why, sold off in a jiffy, and no character, and I might find myself slaved about under a butcher's boy, or worked to death at some seaside place where no one cared for me, except to find out how fast I could go, or be flogged along in some cart with three or four great men in it going out for a Sunday spree, as I have often seen in the place I lived in before I came here...
  29. distend
    become wider
    Of course Ginger was very much excited; she flung up her head with flashing eyes and distended nostrils, declaring that men were both brutes and blockheads.
  30. laden
    filled with a great quantity
    ...sometimes, if mistress met a heavily laden horse with his head strained up she would stop the carriage and get out, and reason with the driver in her sweet serious voice, and try to show him how foolish and cruel it was.
  31. bay
    of a moderate reddish-brown color
    I remember he was riding me toward home one morning when we saw a powerful man driving toward us in a light pony chaise, with a beautiful little bay pony, with slender legs and a high-bred sensitive head and face.
  32. rile
    disturb, especially by minor irritations
    I love horses, and it riles me to see them badly used; it is a bad plan to aggravate an animal till he uses his heels; the first time is not always the last.
  33. sham
    something that is a counterfeit; not what it seems to be
    “Your master never taught you a truer thing,” said John; “there is no religion without love, and people may talk as much as they like about their religion, but if it does not teach them to be good and kind to man and beast it is all a sham—all a sham, James, and it won't stand when things come to be turned inside out.”
  34. livery
    a uniform, especially worn by servants and chauffeurs
    I can trust his word and I can trust his work; he is gentle and clever with the horses, and I would rather have them in charge with him than with half the young fellows I know of in laced hats and liveries...
  35. droll
    comical in an odd or whimsical manner
    “James, my lad, set down the oats and come here; I am very glad to find that John's opinion of your character agrees so exactly with my own. John is a cautious man,” he said, with a droll smile...
  36. shilling
    an English coin worth one twentieth of a pound
    He would have eighteen shillings a week at first, a stable suit, a driving suit, a bedroom over the coachhouse, and a boy under him.
  37. postscript
    a note appended to a letter after the signature
    “Your word will go the furthest, John,” said the master, “for Sir Clifford adds in a postscript, 'If I could find a man trained by your John I should like him better than any other;' so, James, lad, think it over, talk to your mother at dinner-time, and then let me know what you wish.”
  38. omnibus
    a vehicle carrying many passengers
    He was sure to go to the railway station just as the train was coming in, and cabs and carriages, carts and omnibuses were all trying to get over the bridge together; that bridge wanted good horses and good drivers when the railway bell was ringing, for it was narrow, and there was a very sharp turn up to the station, where it would not have been at all difficult for people to run into each other, if they did not look sharp and keep their wits about them.
  39. jockey
    someone employed to ride horses in horse races
    You see, I have been about horses ever since I was twelve years old, in hunting stables, and racing stables; and being small, ye see, I was jockey for several years; but at the Goodwood, ye see, the turf was very slippery and my poor Larkspur got a fall, and I broke my knee, and so of course I was of no more use there.
  40. din
    a loud, harsh, or strident noise
    On the other side the yard windows were thrown up, and people were shouting all sorts of things; but I kept my eye fixed on the stable door, where the smoke poured out thicker than ever, and I could see flashes of red light; presently I heard above all the stir and din a loud, clear voice, which I knew was master's...
  41. draught
    a dose of liquid medicine
    One night John had to give me a draught; Thomas Green came in to help him.
  42. fore
    situated at or toward the front
    There were the two horses straining and struggling with all their might to drag the cart out, but they could not move it; the sweat streamed from their legs and flanks, their sides heaved, and every muscle was strained, while the man, fiercely pulling at the head of the fore horse, swore and lashed most brutally.
  43. impudent
    improperly forward or bold
    “Mind your own business, you impudent young rascal, and I'll mind mine!”
  44. magistrate
    a lay judge or civil authority who administers the law
    “Thank ye, my lad,” said the man, running in for his hat; then pausing for a moment, “Will you give evidence of what you saw if I should bring the fellow up before a magistrate?”
  45. usage
    the act of employing
    We heard afterward that he had given his evidence so clearly, and the horses were in such an exhausted state, bearing marks of such brutal usage, that the carter was committed to take his trial, and might possibly be sentenced to two or three months in prison.
Created on April 12, 2018 (updated April 13, 2018)

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